Cleanwater Nashville

Metro Water Services

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Additional updates

Washington CSO Control Facility goes online

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:35 AM

Washington CSO Control Facility goes onlineA major combined sewer facility providing optimization for wet weather storage, screening and control of floatables and solids went online in April of this year. In addition to providing treatment, the facility dramatically reduces the number of overflows at the Washington outfall, and reduces the volume of overflows by approximately 90 percent annually.

Constructed at a cost of approximately $17 million, it was operationally complete in time to meet the Consent Decree milestone.
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Update on the Metro Nashville Consent Decree Program

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:34 AM

Update on the Metro Nashville Consent Decree ProgramOn August 6, 2012, Scott Potter and Ron Taylor of Metro Water Services provided an update on the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program program to the Metro Council. This presentation addressed the status of the Consent Decree and planned projects included in the Long Term Control Plan for Metro Nashville Combined Sewer Overflows (Long Term Control Plan update) and the Corrective Action Plan/Engineering Report.Click here to download a copy of the presentation.
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Volunteers assist Mother Nature’s work

While the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program involves a tremendous amount of construction activity to improve water quality, an important contribution from Mother Nature is on the way thanks to efforts of numerous local environmental groups.
The Tennessee Environmental Council is spearheading a major project in February to plant 50,000 trees across Tennessee, including thousands in Davidson County. On March 14, volunteers representing Mill Creek, Richland Creek and Whites Creek watershed alliances and Cumberland River Compact will plant bare root seedlings of Virginia pine, pin oak, Shumard oak, red bud, American plum and other varieties near the waterlines of area streams and creeks.
The addition of trees is a green solution to improve local water quality. Trees help reduce pollution by filtering stormwater runoff before it reaches waterways. Keeping rivers and streams clean improves downstream water quality and ensures a safe water supply.
Other supporting partners in 50K Tree Day are Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation and Tennessee Department of Agriculture.