Cleanwater Nashville

Metro Water Services

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Additional updates

New program website expands public access

Date added: 26-Aug-2015 07:27 AM

New program website expands public accessCLEAN WATER NASHVILLE HAS LAUNCHED A NEWLY DESIGNED WEBSITE that provides easier navigation, expanded public resources and improved tools such as an interactive map to provide citizens access to information about this important program. The website was redeveloped based on feedback provided by representatives from Metro Water Services, public and private partners and participating stakeholders.
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Compact encourages new engineering for old designs

Date added: 26-Aug-2015 07:16 AM

Compact encourages new engineering for old designsLONG-TERM QUALITY AND CONSERVATION of Nashville’s waterways demands enhanced stormwater practices and deeper public understanding and awareness. Fortunately in Nashville, numerous organizations are contributing to the conversation and creating momentum.
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Night Work Begins for the 16” Water Transmission Main and Pump Station Project

Date added: 23-Sep-2016 08:46 AM

Night Work Begins for the 16” Water Transmission Main and Pump Station ProjectOn Monday, March 2, 2015, Metro Water Services began the construction of a water main and water pumping station project with portions of work being adjacent to the Cleanwater Nashville OAP project, Lakewood Rehabilitation.

Starting May 31, 2015, night work will begin taking place for the construction of the water main portion of this project along Old Hickory Boulevard from 22nd to Hadley within the TDOT right of way. Due to traffic along Old Hickory Boulevard, TDOT restrictions require work to be completed from 7PM to 6AM. The work is expected to take approximately 2 months to complete.

For the initial project notification letter with more detail, please click here.

For more information regarding this work, please contact Metro Water Services.
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Volunteers assist Mother Nature’s work

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:34 AM

Volunteers assist Mother Nature’s workLocal environmental groups aid Clean Water Nashville by planting trees to keep rivers and streams clean.
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Remote-controlled cameras provide eyes for underground pipe repairs

The majority of Nashville’s sewer system lies hidden beneath streets and buried in easements. Since it cannot be readily observed, Metro Water Services (MWS) deploys a variety of technologies to assess the system’s condition.

One of those technologies, known as closed circuit television (CCTV) inspection, involves viewing the inside of a pipe via a remotely-operated camera in the sewer. The camera, typically installed on a small wheel-based chassis, records video as it travels down the pipe. The video can be viewed in real time by the operator or saved for future evaluation.

CCTV inspection is a fundamental tool utilized by MWS and the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program (CWNOAP) to assess the condition of the sewer system, including:

  • Confirming pipe material, pipe size, and location of service laterals
  • Locating obstructions such as roots, grease, or debris that may require cleaning
  • Identifying evidence of groundwater infiltration or rainfall-derived infiltration and inflow that may need to be sealed to prevent sanitary sewer overflows
  • Locating structural defects within the pipe that may lead to future pipe failures
Mounted on a wheeled “rover” chassis (shown in Photo 1), closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras provide eyes that assist with maintenance and repairs of the underground sewer system. The camera identifies cracked and broken pipe sections (Photo 2) and locations of debris, grease, or roots (Photo 3) that may block the sewer. CCTV inspection can also identify locations of unwanted groundwater infiltration (Photo 4) that reduce available capacity. Occasionally wildlife, such as a mouse (Photo 5) or a snake (photo 6), enter the system through larger defects. With CCTV inspection, defects can be identified and repaired, restoring the pipe to its proper function (Photo 6)

Detecting problems via CCTV inspection is only half the job; the next step is to fix them. If an obstruction is identified, MWS can send remotely-operated cleaning equipment into the sewer to remove the potential blockage and restore the capacity of the sewer pipe.

If significant structural defects or leaks are observed, MWS has a high-tech solution for that part, too. As long as a pipe isn’t severely damaged, MWS can use a technology called cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) lining to rehabilitate the pipe through the installation of a seamless, tight-fitting, corrosion-resistant liner within the original host pipe.

This new lining improves pipe hydraulics, restores the pipe to a structurally sound condition, and addresses leaks into and out of the sewer.