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2011 Collection System Structural Defect Repair project completed

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:26 AM

2011 Collection System Structural Defect Repair project completedThe 2011 Collection System Structural Defect Repair project involved repair of wastewater infrastructure across an expansive area of the Whites Creek and Richland Creek drainage basins in northwest and west Nashville. The project is the largest so far from a geographic standpoint, spreading across 10 Metro Council districts.

Work included repair to cracked and broken system pipes that had begun to leak and diminish system capacity. The program’s contractors used closed circuit television cameras, extended by cables into the pipe system, to identify deterioration and catalog more than 25 major repairs.
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Driftwood Equalization Facility modifications completed, doubling facility's capacity

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:31 AM

Driftwood Equalization Facility modifications completed, doubling facility's capacityThe Driftwood Equalization Facility, located on the eastern edge of downtown Nashville, off of Hermitage Avenue on Visco Drive, has been modified to store an additional 3.2 million gallons of combined sewage during peak rain events. This project is a means of reducing or eliminating wet weather overflows during major rain events.

By raising the concrete walls at Driftwood’s open storage facility and installing six new weir gates, CWN has doubled water detention capacity to almost 7 million gallons.
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Lakewood Infrastructure Improvement Project Open House held

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:32 AM

Lakewood Infrastructure Improvement Project Open House heldConstruction will begin in January 2014 to renew water and wastewater infrastructure in the Lakewood community. In advance of that construction, a community open house was held to provide community members information about the project, which is part of a citywide initiative to meet the U.S. Clean Water Act and replace aged infrastructure to benefit future generations.

The project will modernize Lakewood’s water, wastewater and stormwater infrastructure, the results of which will include improving water flow, reducing standing water during big rain events, and addressing sewer overflows.
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Clean Water Nashville Program supports the Cumberland River Compact by entering the Dragon Boat Race!

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:28 AM

Clean Water Nashville Program supports the Cumberland River Compact by entering the Dragon Boat Race!Each year the Cumberland River compact hosts the Cumberland River Dragon boat festival, which includes a daylong series of Dragon boat races along the Cumberland River at Riverfront Park. This year the Clean Water Nashville Program supported the festival, including entering a team in the Dragon Boat race competition held on September 7.
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Natural setting shapes repair approach

Goal is limiting environmental impact

DAVIDSON COUNTY’S SURROUNDING environment is an ever-present factor in how the Clean Water Nashville Program plans construction repairs on aged and defective wastewater infrastructure.

The Westchester Drive Rehabilitation project, located in the Belshire community between Belshire Drive and Dickerson Road in northern Nashville, is a prime example of the efforts to minimize construction impacts and limit environmental disturbances.

This project will rehabilitate approximately 3,850 linear feet of sewer pipe that runs along and crosses underneath the North Fork of Ewing Creek, a Whites Creek tributary. Cracked 10-, 15- and 18-inch diameter pipes within this local system have been allowing rainfall, creek water, and groundwater to seep in and take up capacity in the sewer system. This kind of infiltration may result in flow rates that exceed the capacity of the sewer system, resulting in sanitary sewer system overflows.

The program team evaluated two options to update the infrastructure in the project area. One option was to dig out the extensive pipe system and install new infrastructure, an approach that could cause considerable disturbance to the creek, including removal of established vegetation along the waterway.

The second alternative, which was selected, was to rehabilitate the current sewer system through a method known as “cured in-place pipe lining.” In this trenchless rehabilitation method, a pipe lining is placed in the existing sewer and is cured to form a rigid pipe within the existing sewer that effectively seals cracks and prevents water infiltration.

Rehabilitating the existing sewer pipe infrastructure rather that replacing it with new pipes will achieve the same outcome while minimizing impact to the North Fork of Ewing Creek.

Westchester Drive Rehabilitation construction began in June and is scheduled to be complete in November 2015.