Cleanwater Nashville

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Additional updates

Metro Parks teamwork delivers West Park update

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:33 AM

Metro Parks teamwork delivers West Park updateAn exciting design to significantly improve the function, health and use of West Park will be completed this summer.
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Lakewood office reflects communications priority

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:32 AM

Lakewood office reflects communications priorityCommunity outreach is an important component of Clean Water Nashville. Before work starts on every project, CWN identifies neighborhood stakeholders so that all parties are aware of the purpose, impact and work schedule.
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Compact drives water quality education

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:29 AM

Compact drives water quality education Throughout this summer, the Cumberland River Compact is hosting a high-profile series titled Innovations and Solutions. The series focuses on the most pressing environmental, legal and political issues facing our local waterways. Clean Water Nashville Director Ron Taylor was honored to participate in the April launch of the series.
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Cumberland River Compact driving water quality awareness and education

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:30 AM

Cumberland River Compact driving water quality awareness and educationEnvironmental awareness and education is vitally important to the health of the Cumberland River and area creeks and streams. Nashville is fortunate to have community partners such as the Cumberland River Compact dedicated to improving the watershed.

The Cumberland River Compact, a group of citizens and community leaders, created the Cumberland River Center to lead protection of the river against pollution, drought, storm water runoff and other challenges.
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Natural setting shapes repair approach

Goal is limiting environmental impact

DAVIDSON COUNTY’S SURROUNDING environment is an ever-present factor in how the Clean Water Nashville Program plans construction repairs on aged and defective wastewater infrastructure.

The Westchester Drive Rehabilitation project, located in the Belshire community between Belshire Drive and Dickerson Road in northern Nashville, is a prime example of the efforts to minimize construction impacts and limit environmental disturbances.

This project will rehabilitate approximately 3,850 linear feet of sewer pipe that runs along and crosses underneath the North Fork of Ewing Creek, a Whites Creek tributary. Cracked 10-, 15- and 18-inch diameter pipes within this local system have been allowing rainfall, creek water, and groundwater to seep in and take up capacity in the sewer system. This kind of infiltration may result in flow rates that exceed the capacity of the sewer system, resulting in sanitary sewer system overflows.

The program team evaluated two options to update the infrastructure in the project area. One option was to dig out the extensive pipe system and install new infrastructure, an approach that could cause considerable disturbance to the creek, including removal of established vegetation along the waterway.

The second alternative, which was selected, was to rehabilitate the current sewer system through a method known as “cured in-place pipe lining.” In this trenchless rehabilitation method, a pipe lining is placed in the existing sewer and is cured to form a rigid pipe within the existing sewer that effectively seals cracks and prevents water infiltration.

Rehabilitating the existing sewer pipe infrastructure rather that replacing it with new pipes will achieve the same outcome while minimizing impact to the North Fork of Ewing Creek.

Westchester Drive Rehabilitation construction began in June and is scheduled to be complete in November 2015.