Cleanwater Nashville

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Additional updates

Metro Nashville receives CAP/ER approval

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:39 AM

Metro Nashville receives CAP/ER approvalIn late August 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in conjunction with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), approved the Corrective Action Plan / Engineering Report for Sanitary Sewer Overflows (CAP/ER). The CAP/ER outlines Metro Water Services’ plan to address sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) in Davidson County and is one of two key pillars of the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program.
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CWWTP: Gathering neighborhood input

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:28 AM

CWWTP: Gathering neighborhood inputOn January 15, 2018, Metro Water Services (MWS) participated in a meeting with residents from the redeveloping neighborhoods of Salemtown and Germantown to discuss the improvements to the nearby Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWWTP).
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Assessing and rehabilitating manholes

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:16 AM

Assessing and rehabilitating manholes During numerous sewer evaluation and rehabilitation projects, the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program assesses the condition of manholes to identify...
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Plans for CWWTP Expansion

Date added: 01-Sep-2017 02:47 PM

Plans for CWWTP ExpansionMetro Water Services is advancing plans for a major expansion of the Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWWTP). The plant was originally constructed in 1958 and has been expanded several times through the years to address environmental quality standards and to meet demands of Nashville’s growth.
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MWS hosts mobile workshop

In November 2015, Nashville was home to the National League of Cities 2015 Congress of Cities, and Metro Water Services (MWS) proudly hosted a contingent of the visiting municipal officials for a workshop about the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program (Program).

The National League of Cities 2015 Congress of Cities is the nation’s largest annual gathering of mayors and elected officials who represent cities across the United States. MWS conducted a mobile workshop, titled “Clean Water, Healthy Environment,” to showcase Nashville’s Program to address combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) in order to improve water quality in the Cumberland River and Nashville’s network of streams, creeks, and tributaries.

“Because many cities are facing the need for dedicated, large-scale efforts for water quality improvements, the Clean Water Nashville Program is a good model for city leaders to study. A comprehensive water quality and infrastructure improvement program is a complex, major enterprise. We provided our guests with practical information about the Program - how it was developed and how we are making progress toward the goals of clean water for our community and regulatory compliance,” said Clean Water Nashville Program Director Ron Taylor, P.E.

MWS is several years into the implementation of this Program and shared numerous lessons that could be applicable to other communities regardless of their size or whether the utility is facing regulatory enforcement. The lessons focused on the Program’s implementation, communication efforts, and collaboration with other groups.

Former Metro Councilman Peter Westerholm provided the introduction for the mobile workshop, and Ron Taylor, MWS’s Program Director; Kimberly Martin, Deputy Program Manager from CDM Smith; and Mark Warriner, Construction Manager from Gresham Smith & Partners, provided details about the Clean Water Nashville Program.

Since Nashville’s initiatives to improve water quality are not limited to the work of the Program, Michael Hunt from MWS’s Stormwater Division provided information about stormwater and watershed management work, such as grading permits, illicit discharge investigations, and water quality sampling. Mekayle Houghton, Executive Director of the Cumberland River Compact (CRC), described how the CRC works with MWS to educate and engage community members to make strategic, positive impacts to improve water quality.

The presentations were held at the Cumberland River Compact, and after the presentations, the mobile workshop continued to the sites of two completed projects, the Driftwood Equalization Facility and the Mill Creek Equalization Facility Phase II.