Cleanwater Nashville

Metro Water Services

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Additional updates

Clean Water Nashville projects nearing completion

Date added: 01-Sep-2017 02:44 PM

Clean Water Nashville projects nearing completionA handful of large-scale Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program (CWNOAP) projects will be completed in late 2017 and early 2018, renewing system infrastructure and boosting Nashville’s compliance with the Clean Water Act by reducing wastewater overflows into the environment.
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Remote-controlled cameras provide eyes for underground pipe repairs

Date added: 01-Sep-2017 01:38 PM

Remote-controlled cameras provide eyes for underground pipe repairsThe majority of Nashville’s sewer system lies hidden beneath streets and buried in easements. Since it cannot be readily observed, Metro Water Services (MWS) deploys a variety of technologies to assess the system’s condition.
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West Park Equalization Facility Phase II is taking shape

Date added: 23-Feb-2017 01:57 PM

West Park Equalization Facility Phase II is taking shapeConstruction of a new, circular-shaped 260-foot diameter, 21 million gallon wet weather storage tank increases the capacity of wastewater storage during wet weather events. The new storage tank will be utilized when sewer flows exceed the capacity of the existing West Park Pump Station.
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Clean Water Nashville Program 5-year Update

Date added: 23-Feb-2017 01:47 PM

Clean Water Nashville Program 5-year UpdateNow in its sixth year, the Clean Water Nashville Program has achieved considerable advancement for both environmental compliance and overall system improvements across Davidson County. Program highlights include:
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Driftwood Equalization Facility modifications completed, doubling facility's capacity

The Driftwood Equalization Facility, located on the eastern edge of downtown Nashville, off of Hermitage Avenue on Visco Drive, has been modified to store an additional 3.2 million gallons of combined sewage during peak rain events. This project is a means of reducing or eliminating wet weather overflows during major rain events.

By raising the concrete walls at Driftwood’s open storage facility and installing six new weir gates, CWN has doubled water detention capacity to almost 7 million gallons.

The added capacity is a significant achievement for Cumberland River water quality. Before expansion, the facility experienced an average of six combined sewer overflows (CSOs) into the Cumberland each year. The newly expanded facility is now large enough that hydraulic models project zero CSOs in a typical rainfall year. With the improvement to Driftwood and the recent elimination of CSO discharge locations at Broadway and Van Buren, Nashville has substantially reduced overflows into the Cumberland.