Cleanwater Nashville

Metro Water Services

News

Additional updates

Washington CSO Control Facility goes online

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:35 AM

Washington CSO Control Facility goes onlineA major combined sewer facility providing optimization for wet weather storage, screening and control of floatables and solids went online in April of this year. In addition to providing treatment, the facility dramatically reduces the number of overflows at the Washington outfall, and reduces the volume of overflows by approximately 90 percent annually.

Constructed at a cost of approximately $17 million, it was operationally complete in time to meet the Consent Decree milestone.
[read more...]

Update on the Metro Nashville Consent Decree Program

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:34 AM

Update on the Metro Nashville Consent Decree ProgramOn August 6, 2012, Scott Potter and Ron Taylor of Metro Water Services provided an update on the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program program to the Metro Council. This presentation addressed the status of the Consent Decree and planned projects included in the Long Term Control Plan for Metro Nashville Combined Sewer Overflows (Long Term Control Plan update) and the Corrective Action Plan/Engineering Report.Click here to download a copy of the presentation.
[read more...]

Compact encourages new engineering for old designs

LONG-TERM QUALITY AND CONSERVATION of Nashville’s waterways demands enhanced stormwater practices and deeper public understanding and awareness. Fortunately in Nashville, numerous organizations are contributing to the conversation and creating momentum.

The Cumberland River Compact recently hosted a high-profile speaker series entitled Innovations and Solutions that focused on the most pressing environmental, legal, and political issues facing our local waterways. The series highlighted policies, regulations, and projects that will improve water quality and stream health.

Rebecca Dohn, Metro Water Services, previewed the upcoming 2016 policy changes that will require all new development projects to capture the first inch of rainfall on their sites. Benefits and incentives for this path are listed on the MWS website.

“This design methodology attempts to mimic a site’s natural hydrology, which helps mitigate the impact of development on our waterways,” said Dohn.

Civil & Environmental Consultants’ Steve Casey, discussed a recent stormwater upgrade project to improve the water quality of Cathy Jo Branch, a small headwater stream flowing through the Nashville Zoo. The project, conducted in collaboration with the Zoo and the Cumberland River Compact, has improved water quality for the stream, removed six acres of invasive plants, and created a new exhibit space of native grass prairie for elk and bison.

Through collaboration, education and action, the Compact’s goal is to ensure clean and abundant water sources that support life, recreation and economic well-being for generations to come. To learn more about the Cumberland River Compact, visit http://cumberlandrivercompact.org/.