Cleanwater Nashville

Metro Water Services

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Additional updates

Metro Nashville receives CAP/ER approval

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:39 AM

Metro Nashville receives CAP/ER approvalIn late August 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in conjunction with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), approved the Corrective Action Plan / Engineering Report for Sanitary Sewer Overflows (CAP/ER). The CAP/ER outlines Metro Water Services’ plan to address sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) in Davidson County and is one of two key pillars of the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program.
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CWWTP: Gathering neighborhood input

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:28 AM

CWWTP: Gathering neighborhood inputOn January 15, 2018, Metro Water Services (MWS) participated in a meeting with residents from the redeveloping neighborhoods of Salemtown and Germantown to discuss the improvements to the nearby Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWWTP).
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Assessing and rehabilitating manholes

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:16 AM

Assessing and rehabilitating manholes During numerous sewer evaluation and rehabilitation projects, the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program assesses the condition of manholes to identify...
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Plans for CWWTP Expansion

Date added: 01-Sep-2017 02:47 PM

Plans for CWWTP ExpansionMetro Water Services is advancing plans for a major expansion of the Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWWTP). The plant was originally constructed in 1958 and has been expanded several times through the years to address environmental quality standards and to meet demands of Nashville’s growth.
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Broadway, Van Buren overflows eliminated

Metro Nashville is making significant progress toward improving Cumberland River water quality, eliminating two downtown combined sewer overflow (CSO) points. Closing the Broadway and Van Buren CSO’s reduces the number of Davidson County overflow points by 25 percent and reduces the amount of contaminated stormwater and wastewater flowing directly into the Cumberland River. To achieve this success, Metro Water Services modified existing infrastructure so flows would be routed to the Central Waterwater Treatment Plant instead of flowing untreated directly into the river.