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Whites Creek project results in water quality improvement

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:35 AM

Whites Creek project results in water quality improvementThe Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC) and Metro Water Services (MWS) lifted a longstanding ‘water contact advisory’ for a 2.9-mile section of Whites Creek, a sign of improved water quality for Whites Creek and the Cumberland River.
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Dodson Chapel Project wins construction awards

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:31 AM

Dodson Chapel Project wins construction awardsDodson Chapel Pumping Station and Equalization Facility are the subject of two major construction industry awards.
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Cockrill Springs is ‘new’ feature of Centennial Park

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:28 AM

Cockrill Springs is ‘new’ feature of Centennial ParkA plan to “daylight” the historic Cockrill Spring at Centennial Park will provide a dramatic new natural feature at the park’s West End Avenue entrance while also producing water quality improvements on the campus.

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CWN infrastructure renewal projects on the rise

Date added: 11-Aug-2015 09:30 AM

CWN infrastructure renewal projects on the rise Shelby Park Rehabilitation and Cowan/Riverside Rehabilitation – began the comprehensive system renewal in vast areas of East and North Nashville. The projects will rehabilitate defective, 1960s-era sewer system pipes and service connections across many square miles of residential and commercial neighborhoods. Improving sewer system performance in these basins will reduce wet weather, sanitary sewer overflows into the Cumberland River.

Annual Rehabilitation FY2013 is a countywide project that will soon start construction to rehabilitate approximately 150 segments of isolated, defective gravity sewer lines and repair service connections.
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Compact drives water quality education

WHILE CLEAN WATER NASHVILLE CONDUCTS physical improvements to water and wastewater systems to improve water quality, public education and awareness remain vital keys for our waterways’ long-term quality and conservation.

Fortunately in Nashville, numerous organizations are contributing to public education. This summer, the Cumberland River Compact is hosting a high-profile series titled Innovations and Solutions that focuses on the most pressing environmental, legal and political issues facing our local waterways.

Clean Water Nashville Director Ron Taylor participated in an April launch of the series, which brought together government agencies, technical professionals, neighborhood groups, agricultural interests and watershed stakeholders to engage in important dialogue about the future of the Cumberland River Basin and its tributaries.

Innovations and Solutions is one series in the Compact’s broader River Talks program. Other series in this program include History of the Cumberland, Travelers on the Cumberland and The Bob Brown Talks dedicated to the life and legacy of Bob Brown.

“The Cumberland River and its tributaries are intertwined throughout this region, and not just geologically speaking,” said Compact Executive Director Mekayle Houghton. “The watershed is a part of our history, economy, culture and overall health. River Talks celebrates the Cumberland in all of these facets by featuring leading experts in each field. All are welcome to attend these free events to learn more about the Cumberland, and hopefully to deepen the community’s appreciation for it.”

An example of public education is a seminar on reducing storm water runoff through green infrastructure. Illustrating the wide range of participation intended to reach wider audiences, this event will include homeowners to technical professionals – all eager to learn about advances and solutions in green engineering, construction, policy and law.

Through collaboration, education and action, the Compact’s goal is to ensure clean and abundant water sources that support life, recreation and economic well-being for generations to come. To learn more about the Cumberland River Compact, visit cumberlandrivercompact.org.