Cleanwater Nashville

Metro Water Services

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Additional updates

West Park Improvements Complete

Date added: 05-Sep-2018 08:59 AM

West Park Improvements CompleteMayor David Briley, Council Member Mary Carolyn Roberts, and officials from Metro Parks and Metro Water Services (MWS) celebrated the completion of major improvements at West Park on August 18, 2018. Enhancements to West Park, which began in 2015 as a collaborative project between Metro Parks and MWS, include new recreation amenities as well as updated wastewater system infrastructure to improve water quality in Richland Creek.
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Metro Nashville receives CAP/ER approval

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:39 AM

Metro Nashville receives CAP/ER approvalIn late August 2017, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in conjunction with the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation (TDEC), approved the Corrective Action Plan / Engineering Report for Sanitary Sewer Overflows (CAP/ER). The CAP/ER outlines Metro Water Services’ plan to address sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) in Davidson County and is one of two key pillars of the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program.
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CWWTP: Gathering neighborhood input

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:28 AM

CWWTP: Gathering neighborhood inputOn January 15, 2018, Metro Water Services (MWS) participated in a meeting with residents from the redeveloping neighborhoods of Salemtown and Germantown to discuss the improvements to the nearby Central Wastewater Treatment Plant (CWWTP).
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Assessing and rehabilitating manholes

Date added: 01-Mar-2018 07:16 AM

Assessing and rehabilitating manholes During numerous sewer evaluation and rehabilitation projects, the Clean Water Nashville Overflow Abatement Program assesses the condition of manholes to identify...
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2011 Collection System Structural Defect Repair project completed

The 2011 Collection System Structural Defect Repair project involved repair of wastewater infrastructure across an expansive area of the Whites Creek and Richland Creek drainage basins in northwest and west Nashville. The project is the largest so far from a geographic standpoint, spreading across 10 Metro Council districts.

Work included repair to cracked and broken system pipes that had begun to leak and diminish system capacity. The program’s contractors used closed circuit television cameras, extended by cables into the pipe system, to identify deterioration and catalog more than 25 major repairs.


Construction crews used two primary methods to make repairs to underground pipes. One, known as cured in place pipe, involved inserting a flexible resin saturated liner into a manhole and along the length of the pipe. The liner forms to the circular shape of the pipe, and then workers introduce steam or hot water that hardens the epoxy resin and forms a new plastic liner within the original host pipe for a secure, permanent repair. The second method involved excavating six- to- eight-foot sections of broken pipe for installation of replacement pipe that is coupled into the existing system.

All roadway, public easements and residential properties that were disturbed for repairs were promptly returned to pre-existing condition.